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usonian - U.S. resident, to avoid mix up with all the other people living in North America and South America. (ED. Given that the United States of America is the only country in the world that has "America" as part of its name, mixups are unlikely.)

e.g., The USonians are leading the statistics.

submitted by Henric Jensen - (www)

uspiquitweek - You-Speak-We-Tweek. The presence of sketchy, incomprehensible chatter and nonsense speech that is found to be ubiquitous.

e.g., The mayor's party ended several days ago, but the uspiquitweek lingered well into the following weekend.

submitted by Xian

usrael - A made-up word that captures the essence of the political economic and military merger of Israel and the United States.

e.g., Iran views its geopolitical struggle as a conflict with Usrael.

submitted by Norman Elliott - (www)

usseparation - A type of independence that happens within various countries that have many territories or have many peoples that want to be independent from one another, such as the USSR and Yugoslavia.

e.g., Once again, Yugoslavia is undergoing another USSeparation, with Kosovo this time..

submitted by SilverCoyote

ust! - Date 1999, pronounced "ouost." Noun, interjection, colloquialism, adjective. 1. Literal: short for usted -- you, in Spanish -- which is a short version of the phrase "You stop it!" 2. Noun: Post facto expression to describe effeminism, saucy, swishy, or swashbuckling. 3. Interjection: Ust! An expression of the previous definition. When somebody says something such as "Is this shirt too pink on me?" you reply, "Ust!"

e.g., "Is this shirt too pink on me?" "Ust!"

submitted by Leonard

usta-could - Usta-could: Used to be able to do something but can't now. Possibly from the Midwest or the South, both my parents used this expression and Dad was from MN & Mom from MI.

e.g., I usta-could play guitar JUST like Hendrix but since I lost my pinkie in that bandsaw accident, I can't anymore.

submitted by Glenna Foreman

ustable - Use[d] to be able to. (ED. Are there any words other than adjustable that end in -ustable? Inquiring minds want to know.)

e.g., Ustable smoke in pubs, dammit. The world is being taken over by pussies wusses.

submitted by Neil Carter

ustacould - southern expression for a lost ability.

e.g., Since I broke my leg, I can't dance...but I ustacould.

submitted by Steve

ustanot - Something you did not previously like, do, see, etc.

e.g., I ustanot like mustard, but I do now.

submitted by Aimee Easton

usual oy - Yiddish term for a regularly occurring event of somewhat mild interest.

e.g., After dinner, Uncle Herman had one of his usual oy gastric attacks.

submitted by Machiavellean & . . . Lesko

usurposis - A disorder causing the sufferer to always have to top or "one up" what anyone else has said or done.

e.g., So I showed Joe this cool rock I found, and of course he replied usurposisly,"My dad's got a rock collection in the attic that has every kind of rock, gem, and mineral in the world."

submitted by Steve Zihlavsky

usweasm - The mystical state where I and you and we and us all mush together and we are now communicating in a different way.

e.g., Out in the usweasm again, huh?

submitted by Diana - (www)

utang - (pronounced OO-tang, n.) 1. Someone who is bankrupt or penniless; 2. Someone who cannot pay his debts; 3. A person with too many commitments. 4. (interj.) An expletive describing a situation in which one does not possess the wherewithal to meet their obligations. [from the English word _orangoutang_ (the Dutch word derived from the Malay _ourang_ 'man' + _hutan_ 'forest')---in Malaysian, however, while _hutan_ means 'forest,' _utang_ apparently means 'debts.' Thus, instead of "man of the forest" (_ourangutan_), we often call these primates "men of debts" (_ourangutang_).]

e.g., "Hey, Ed, can you lend me 50 bucks? I'm taking Ellen out and I'm broke." "Sorry, man: utang." "

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

utensili - Plural for the non-food stuff you need to have a pot luck meal like plates, cups, forks, etc.

e.g., We are are asking everyone to bring extra food and utensili to accommodate about a dozen additional hungry men.

submitted by Ed O'Neil

utilisgastrohood - The state of participating in good use of one's gastrointestinal tract, or having exceptionally good taste in various elements of gastronomy.

e.g., Having annihilated two dozen oysters, Bertleshire and I embraced in utilisgastrohood.

submitted by Gnats

utleast - Of the least, smallest, or lowest degree or quantity; may be used pejoratively to describe compliance, effort, or result.

e.g., 1. Thanks to reduced pay, longer hours, and constant micromanagement, the desk clerks made their utleast efforts to please the guests. 2. I see that the party in power is doing its utleast to help, as usual. 3. In mathematical analysis, an epsilon may be considered the utleast interval of linear measure for purposes of discussion.

submitted by Dana Paxson - (www)

utlegate - Legal process by which someone is outlawed.    Utlegation : If you're familiar with Samuel Butler's "Hudibras," then you will surely know the word utlegation. It appears in the following passage: "Unless, to punish them the worse, You put them in the secular powers And pass their souls, as some demise The same estate in mortgage twice; When to a legal utlegation You turn your excommunication And, for a groat unpaid that's due, Distrain on soul and body too." Butler is, of course, highlighting the dichotomy between religious crime and punishment and secular crime and punishment. Utlegation means outlawing, and in his humble opinion, if you excommunicate someone, then making them an outlaw at the same time is hardly fair. If Butler had not used this word, then the odds are that it would have turned up its toes and died. Aside from mentions in truly comprehensive dictionaries, that poem and this posting may be the only two published mentions of the word in 400 years (according to Googleus, the Greek God of search). This is a truly hybrid word because the prefix 'ut' is Friesian or Germanic, but the 'legation' part is unashamedly Latin. "Exlegation" would make more sense, but it doesn't exist.   Now it does: Legal process by which someone or something is outlawed. To exlegate: to outlaw. See utlegation. The example for exlegate uses what was considered the only proper way to use reverend when I was learning English: Always precede reverend with the. The rules of grammar have eased considerably since then, almost to the point that people make up their own rules. . . . Oh, that's the sort of thing we might be found doing here, isn't it?

e.g., The Lone Ranger was utlegated on grounds of having made

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

utopiary - From Utopia, where all is perfect and topiary, the art of cutting hedges. For a state of slightly mundane perfection in a middle-class housing estate gardening sense.

e.g., Mrs. Gibbs at number 32 is achieving utopiary -- she's in the front garden trimming her bush with the shears right now. I hope she's very careful and doesn't cut herself.

submitted by martibabes

utopify - To make something into a utopia, that is, an idealistic world. Antonym: dystopify.

e.g., World leaders should work together to utopify our planet.

submitted by wordgoat - (www)

uttar - Hindi for "total," "complete".

e.g., After the storm had hit, the northern Indian states were in uttar pradesh (complete disarray).

submitted by kai

utterleast - This word describes the absolute minimum effort a perniciously lazy person has calculated that he needs to expend and yet extract the maximum creature comforts from his existence.

e.g., Good grief, Bryan! Don't overtax yourself tonight popping bon-bons into your face while reclining channel-surfing your life away! You are stretching yourself to the utterleast!

submitted by Dennis R. Ridley

uuvalex - Any part of your digestive system betwixt throat and batty, whatever a batty is.

e.g., Ooh, I've got a nasty stabbing pain right here, in my uuvalex.

submitted by austin - (www)

uz - Southern pronunciation for "was." In parts of the South, an initial "w" sound is often dropped: "young ones" becomes "young-uns" as noted in the linked entry at YourDictionary. The example shows how "She was here last night" would be pronounced by a Southerner. The example would ordinarily be written as "She's here last night" -- which could hardly be mistaken to mean "She is here last night." Some Southerners may have an affinity for certain aspects of antebellum days, but few are seriously anachronistically challenged.

e.g., She uz here last night.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

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