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macroverbumsciolist - 1. One ignorant of large words. 2. One who pretends to know a word, then secretly refers to a dictionary. From the comic strip Robotman.   "This one comes from the comic strip Robotman; I suspect it is completely fanciful, but I like it."

e.g., Dictionary.com is a favored site for macroverbumsciolists.

submitted by [wwftd] - (www)

macroxenoglossophilia - Lover of long, strange words. I almost feel as if I'm cheating entering this. I thought of it only after seeing the pd entry for macroxenoglossophobe, a pseudo-word I can't recall ever seeing before today. (ED. Macroxenoglossophobe may actually be a real word. Hard to tell from what I can turn up with a Google search.)

e.g., "Some of my best friends are macroxenoglossophiles." "Oh, I'm so sorry to hear that. When will they be getting out of prison?"

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

macroxenoglossophobia - Fear of long, strange words.

e.g., So, Charlie, you have macroxenoglossophobia, do you? How does this make you feel: “Let your conversation possess a clarified conciseness, compacted comprehensibleness, coalescent consistency, and a concatenated cogency. Eschew all conglomerations of flatulent garrulity, jejune babblement, and asinine affectations. Let your extemporaneous descantings and unpremeditated expatiations have intelligibility, without rhodomontade or thrasonical bombast. Sedulously avoid all polysyllabical profundity, pompous prolixity, and ventriloquial vapidity. Shun double-entendre and prurient jocosity, whether obscure or apparent. In other words, speak truthfully, naturally, clearly, purely, but do not use large words.” When I first ran across that feast of words in Michael Quinion's Newsletter, he said, “A thrasonical person is a braggart.” He said the above paragraph came from "Notes and Queries, 11 Feb 1893." When I checked today, I found something I must have forgotten: These days, its most frequent appearances are in a widely-reproduced bit of advice to aspiring authors or public speakers. In an idle moment, I set out to trace it to its origin. It turns out to be a hardy perennial, which became popular on both sides of the Atlantic from the 1880s on, appearing regularly in magazines and newspapers. The earliest unearthed so far is in The Pennsylvania School Journal of 1874. It is surely older still. This version is from early in its life. I leave it as an exercise for the reader to find an earlier instance of the advice. That's not my bag. I've found several variations: “In pondering your esoteric cogitations, or articulating superficial sentimentalities and philosophical or psychological observations, beware of platitudinous ponderosity. Let your conversation possess a clarified conciseness, compacted comprehensibleness, coalescent consistency, and a concatenated cogency. Eschew all conglomerations of flatulent garrulity, jejune babblement, and asinine affectations. Let your extemporaneous descantings and unpremeditated expatiations have intelligibility, without rhodomontade or thrasonical bombast. Sedulously avoid all polysyllabical profundity, pompous prolixity, and ventriloquial vapidity. Shun double-entendre and prurient jocosity, whether obscure or apparent. In other words, speak truthfully, naturally, clearly, purely, but do not use large words.” “In promulgating your esoteric cogitations or articulating your superficial sentimentalities and amicable, philosophical or psychological observations, beware of platitudinous ponderosity. Let your conversational communications demonstrate a clarified conciseness, a compact comprehensibleness, no coalescent conglomerations of precious garrulity, jejune bafflement and asinine affectations. Let your extemporaneous verbal evaporations and expatriations have lucidity, intelligibility and veracious vivacity without radomontade or Thespian bombast. Sedulously avoid all polysyllabic profundity, pompous propensity, psittaceous vacuity, ventriloquial verbosity and vaniloquent vapidity. Shun double-entendres, obnoxious jocosity and pestiferous profanity, observable or apparent.” “In promulgating your esoteric cogitations or articulating your superficial sentimentalities, and amicable philosophical or psychological observations, beware of platitudinous ponderosity. Let your conversational communications possess a compacted conciseness, a clarified comprehensibility, a coalescent cogency, and a concatenated consistency. Eschew obfuscation and all conglomeration of flatulent garrulity, jejune babblement, and asinine affectations. Let your extemporaneous descantings and unpremeditated expatiations have intelligibility and voracious vivacity without rodomontade or thrasonical bombast. Sedulously avoid all polysyllabic profundity, pompous prolificacy, and vain vapid verbosity. In short: "Be brief and don't use big words." Next time, in promulgating your esoteric cogitations, or articulating your superficial sentimentalities and amicable, philosophical or psychological observations, beware of platitudinous ponderosity. Let your conversational communications possess a clarified conciseness, a compacted comprehensibleness, coalescent consistency, and a concatenated cogency. Eschew all conglomerations of flatulent garrulity, jejune babblement, and asinine affectations. Let your extemporaneous descantings and unpremeditated expatiations have intelligibility and veracious vivacity, without rodomontade or thrasonical bombast. Sedulously avoid all polysyllabic profundity, pompous prolixity, psittaceous vacuity ventriloquial verbosity, and vaniloquent vapidity. Shun double-entendres, prurient jocosity, and pestiferous profanity, obscurant or apparent!!

submitted by HD Fowler

macrutiae - Significant details, large items -- the opposite of minutiae. Macrutia.

e.g., Gas mileage and price are macrutiae to consider when buying a car.

submitted by Richard Factor - (www)

mactics - "Macking" plus "tactics." Refers to the use of flirtation in a targeted, strategic manner.

e.g., Oh, they're not just talking. He's pullin' out the mactics hardcore.

submitted by Third from Left

maculate - Dirty, faulty, guilty, sinful. The opposite of Immaculate.

e.g., Jimmy, your room is absolutely maculate. I want it cleaned up now.

submitted by Hooty McBob

mad - A lot of, much of.

e.g., That guy has mad skills on the mic.

submitted by Mike C - (www)

mad - As a noun, a period of being angry.

e.g., You're going to have to give me some more time to get over my mad. | The last time I had a mad on, it lasted for more than four hours, so I called my physician to see what I should do about it. Just like they advise in the commercials . . . wait, that's not for mad-ons, is it?

submitted by HD Fowler

mad beef shanks - Name given to a British cow carrying the mad cow virus. The word is a combination of "mad cow," "beef," and "Longshanks"--14th century Enlish king seen in _Braveheart)_.

e.g., If Kent keeps eating the Mad Beef Shanks while he's in Europe, his brain isn't going to be functioning in about 3 months.

submitted by Matt

mad-at-gas-car - A conservationist's vehicle -- one propelled by any other energy form than fossil fuel.

e.g., Ethel: Where ya going, Bro? Deezle: Headed down to get me new wheels. Ethel: What kind ya gettin? Deezle: One of those named like a place. Ethel: Like Malibu, Tacoma, Dakota, or Alpine? Deezle: Nope. No more gas guzzlers. I'm gettin me a new mad-at-gas-car.

submitted by charlie lesko

mad-cell - An abnormally large amount on cellulite on one's back.

e.g., Ever noticed that Chris is afflicted with mad-cell? Not to mention her hairy back.

submitted by eli

mad-dogged - When someone stares you down with the notion that you will look away, back down, or give in. It also can used when someone is doing something stupid, do a ridiculous act, or macking on your ex-girl friend in front of you.

e.g., Nick got mad-dogged at the bar by Sam and Bryson for trying to mack on Matt's Ex-girlfriend.

submitted by matthew

madadhomadhomadmomandad - This rather lengthier-than-necessary word is applicable when somebody makes an ad hominem ad hominem attack. In other words, say, someone accuses you of making an ad hominem attack when you really didn't. As a way to make you feel that your arguments were inferior. Sort of an "adhom-adhom," if you will. Just threw the extra syllables, the "m," the "mom," and the "dad" to make it more passionate and intense. Like you're mad at your mom and dad and you're really upset with someone for seeming to attack you because you weren't able to respond well to her arguments.

e.g., Instead of politely reasoning and addressing my arguments in a logical way, Chris accused me of making an ad hominem attack. I told her she had just committed the debating fallacy of madadhomadhomadmomandad.

submitted by Zeromay Zentroclo

madagascar - Code used by poolplaying cheats in situations where one does not want it to be known that one is coaching another player. Meaning is "Play this shot without English." "You know, Madagascar, where they speak no English."

e.g., Smith is lining up a shot. Jones, sitting down and talking to Black, loudly says, "Last year I took a trip to...Madagascar."

submitted by Allan Hazlett - (www)

madam - A woman who runs a house of prostitution.

e.g., Let's suppose you're right that Iran "negotiated that cessation of hostilities" "ending violence in Basra." You think that's a good thing? You think that demonstrates "the goodwill of the Iranians"? Nan, Iran does what it sees as being in Iran's best interests. Whatever was done sure wasn't done as a gesture of goodwill. You think it's good for Iran to have that much influence in Iraq? I don't. What're you smokin' in your peace pipe, lady madam?

submitted by beelaebub

madamishness - Supercilious, overbearing, or haughtily proud. Used for certain women who are not divas, but come close.

e.g., She was acting madamishnessly

submitted by Tom Cubbage

maddle - Getting your words in a muddle when you're really mad.

e.g., Stop talking, you're getting yourself in a maddle.

submitted by nyika

made an ash of himself - Had himself cremated.

e.g., Yes, that's right. He died last week and in accordance with his wishes made an ash of himself.

submitted by Paul Edic - (www)

madjestical - Fairylike.

e.g., I felt madjestical.

submitted by Brandy 7th English

madme - The dullard in every work environment, self-proclaimed "class joker" who, frankly, is anything but a natural in the role. From the often heard phrases "Watch out, I'm mad, me. I'll do anything, I'm absolutely crazy."

e.g., Avoid Claire, she's a madme.

submitted by Lizzie Landslide

madministrator - 1. A person who has lost her mind because she has too much administrative work to do -- when her job does not primarily involve any administration. For example, teachers. "Nowadays I am mainly a madministrator." 2. A person (say, a line manager) who drives her colleagues insane by obsessive demands for detailed administrative tasks to be performed at all times. 3. Madministration. The over-administration which is insisted upon but is not really required in order for the actual job to be effectively performed.

e.g., Chris has becom a madministrator lately.

submitted by laura pasternack

madness - Rad and really cool or baffling.

e.g., That's madness, brother.

submitted by randy savage

madschool - Hardcore, old school, and mad skill merged.

e.g., Wow, that's madschool.

submitted by Calvin Chan

mafic - 1. Uncool 2. Dark, without light.

e.g., I was all hyped up about the concert, but it turned out to be mafic.

submitted by Aegean - (www)

magafalator - (n) Anything you have no other name for.

e.g., I opened up my computer and connected the wire to the little magafalator on my motherboard.

submitted by michael five

magaxenophilia - Love for the pretentious act of conspicuously placing a foreign-language periodical in plain view (usually whilst at a coffee shop) for the sole purpose of looking cosmopolitan. Not to be confused with someone actually trying to learn or understand the language.

e.g., It took only two questions to realise that it was magaxenophilia, not a love of the culture, that had caused the Afrikaans Times to accidentally fall out of her bookbag. She later confessed that she wasn't exactly sure where Afrikaansas was, but she thought it might be somewhere "in the West." Anyway, she was sure it was one of the flyover states.

submitted by gecko

magence - To pounce on or attack by surprise.

e.g., In the jungle, a predator has to magence their its prey.

submitted by courtneyboud

maggot - A fan of a popular nu-metal band Slipknot. Slipknot is pseudofamous for performing in masks and jumpsuits.

e.g., Look at all of those maggots jumping in that moshpit.

submitted by Captain Retardo (dw)

maggotism - (n.) the quantum force responsible for entropic decay. Sometimes called "electro-maggotism," especially if the decay is rapid or really disgusting. [from_maggot_and_magnetism_.]

e.g., "Wow. that is really disgusting. how long have these pork chops been in here?" "pork chops?! it can't be. those have been in there since ... golly ... november?" "bleaurgh. i'm going to be sick." "how bad is it?" "ugh! maggotism." "electro-maggotism."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

maggotoni - Ole fashion treatment for festering wound: Place live hungry maggots on a wound, they will consume dead flesh and clean up wound .. [neat, eh wot] .. !! {ED. Additional information provided by submitter Scott M. Ellsworth: Only certain maggots are beneficial on wounds. Most will eat the good flesh with the bad. Current "biotherapy" (called so to keep everyone's lunches down) uses Phaenicia sericata (the Green Blowfly), carefully bred for the purpose. It's fascinating stuff.}

e.g., A treat for your maggots And that certain hurting body part, everybody benefits !! Maggotoni does the trick ... mutual interactive cooperative effort, no sweat.

submitted by Paul Edic - (www)

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